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Blogs

Welcome to the Adler's Blogs! Adler Transmissions provides you with the latest news and views from Adler's astronomers, curators, partners, and programming staff. From Earth to distant planets and beyond, This Week in Space discusses the latest discoveries and accomplisments in science, space, and technology.

Herschel Telescope Detects Water on Dwarf Planet

Scientists using the Herschel space observatory have made the first definitive detection of water vapor on the largest and roundest object in the asteroid belt, Ceres.

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Collections Access Initiative

While we love old things in the Adler’s Webster Institute for the History of Astronomy, we are not particularly fond of old databases.

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Rosetta, the Comet-Chasing Spacecraft, is Awake

The Rosetta spacecraft "woke up" after a record 957 days of hibernation. The first communication from the spacecraft arrived at the European Space Operations Center in Darmstadt, Germany, at 1:18 pm EST. 

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Remembering John Dobson

When I was a boy growing up, I longed to look at the stars through a telescope. I'd lay out in my backyard, staring up at the stars and Moon, and wonder what they would look like up close.

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Internet Radio Provides Musical Space-Weather Reports from NASA's LRO Mission

The latest tool for checking space weather is an internet radio station fed by data from NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO. The radio station essentially operates in real time, receiving measurements of how much radiation the spacecraft is experiencing and converting those into a constant stream of music.

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Asteroid Impact

Hi there! I’m an incoming asteroid! It’s a scenario we’ve seen played out in countless movies and TV shows: an astronomer discovers an asteroid on a collision course with the Earth.

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First 2014 Asteroid Discovered

Early Wednesday morning, January 1, the Catalina Sky Survey in Arizona, collected a single track of observations with an immediate follow-up on what was possibly a very small asteroid - 7 to 10 feet in size - on a potential impact trajectory with Earth.

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Best and Worst Astronomy Events of 2013

The end of each year inspires myriad lists of the “best” and “worst” events in many categories – from “best” movies to “worst-dressed” celebrities. This year we are about to add a new list of our own – the astronomical “best” and “worst” of 2013.

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NASA's Hubble Sees Cloudy Super-Worlds With Chance for More Clouds

Scientists using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have characterized the atmospheres of two of the most common type of planets in the Milky Way galaxy and found both may be blanketed with clouds.

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Girls Do Hack Mentor Perspective

A little while back, on the 9th of November, I was fortunate to attend a day-long event called Girls Do Hack at Adler Planetarium.

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Hubble Space Telescope Sees Evidence of Water Vapor Venting off Jupiter Moon

NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope has observed water vapor above the frigid south polar region of Jupiter's moon Europa, providing the first strong evidence of water plumes erupting off the moon's surface.

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Alvan Clark Research in the Adler’s Collections

During my research in astronomy I have learned that the astronomical community is a most generous one. They have been willing to share their time, thoughts, and resources. I have, on a number of occasions, used such resources at the Adler and have found the staff there no less generous. 

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International Space Station's Spacewalkers at Work

Astronauts aboard the International Space Station are conducting a series of emergency spacewalks beginning this weekend that are intended to correct a critical cooling system failure.

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Collections Close-Up: Early Moon Maps

As our closest neighbor in the Universe, the Moon is a natural place for humans to explore. Before the telescope was invented, people usually envisioned the Moon with a smooth surface.

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Do Black Holes Come in Size Medium?

Black holes can be very small, with masses only about 10 times that of our Sun -- or enormous, boasting the equivalent in mass up to 10 billion suns.

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The Perilous Journey of Comet ISON

The vast dark past Pluto is a deep freeze filled with a trillion fragments of ice and rock, the left-over detritus from the formation of the Sun and planets.

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NASA Sees 'Watershed' Cosmic Blast in Unique Detail

On April 27, a blast of light from a dying star in a distant galaxy became the focus of astronomers around the world. The explosion, known as a gamma-ray burst and designated GRB 130427A, tops the charts as one of the brightest ever seen.

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JFK and the Space Race

On May 25, 1961, President John F. Kennedy gave a landmark speech before Congress in which he put forth his bold goal, "I believe that this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to Earth."

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Exploring the Third Dimension of Cassiopeia A

One of the most famous objects in the sky - the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant - will be on display like never before, thanks to NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and a new project from the Smithsonian Institution.

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MAVEN: Course Set for Mars

The Mars Curiosity rover will have a visitor next fall in the form of MAVEN—the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN. Unlike its ground-based, 6-legged friend, however, MAVEN will orbit the red planet and use some high-tech equipment to help scientists uncover a long-standing mystery: what happened to the Martian atmosphere?

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