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Tag: Astronomy

This image depicts a cluster of distorted galaxies. The distorted shapes in the cluster shown here are distant galaxies, from which the light is bent by the gravitational pull of dark matter within the cluster of galaxies.

AstroFan: The Spooky Case of Dark Matter

Sunday October 27th
Bianca Anderson

Header Image: The distorted shapes in the cluster shown here are distant galaxies, from which the light is bent by the gravitational pull of dark matter within the cluster of galaxies. Image Credit: NASA, ESA, M. Postman (STScI), and the CLASH Team Greetings fellow astro-fans! Halloween is almost here, and as you know, it is […]

Image of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

AstroFan: The Comet That Came From Afar

Monday September 30th
Bianca Anderson

Header Image: While C/2019 Q4 (Borisov) is too far away for us to get detailed images, it probably looks something like this image taken on March 27, 2016, by the Rosetta spacecraft, 329 km from the nucleus of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The image measures 28.7 km across. Image Credit: ESA/Rosetta/NavCam The Day the Adler Met an […]

Volunteers using the web-based Milky Way Project brought star-forming features nicknamed "yellowballs" to the attention of researchers, who later showed that they are a phase of massive star formation. The yellow balls -- which are several hundred to thousands times the size of our solar system -- are pictured here in the center of this image taken by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. Infrared light has been assigned different colors; yellow occurs where green and red overlap. The yellow balls represent an intermediary stage of massive star formation that takes place before massive stars carve out cavities in the surrounding gas and dust (seen as green-rimmed bubbles with red interiors in this image). Infrared light of 3.6 microns is blue; 8-micron light is green; and 24-micron light is red.

AstroFan: …And They Were All Yellow!

Monday August 26th
Bianca Anderson

Header Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech “The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies, were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” ― Carl Sagan Even if you’re just a novice space enthusiast, I’m sure you’ve heard some variation of […]

The Perseid meteor shower is well known because it’s a major annual shower that occurs during warm weather in the northern hemisphere. The Perseids usually peak around the night of the 12th and the early-morning darkness of the 13th.

Adler Skywatch: August 2019

Friday August 2nd
Karen Donnelly

One of the year’s most popular meteor showers regularly peaks this month, August 2019. Unfortunately, this year’s shower may be only a wash.  The Perseid meteor shower is well known because it’s a major annual shower that occurs during warm weather in the northern hemisphere. The Perseids usually peak around the night of the 12th […]

Headshot of Brenda, Adler Teen Collections Intern, standing in front of the History of Astronomy collections door

Minorities Take On Museums

Wednesday July 31st
Allegra Minor

An interview with Brenda G., Teen Collections Intern Many people find studying science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) or working in a science institution intimidating, but a whole other layer is added when you’re one of the first in your family to do it. I sat down with collections intern Brenda Galan to discuss her […]

Artist's Illustration of Enceladus

AstroFan: Over the Moon for Enceladus

Monday July 22nd
Bianca Anderson

Header Image Caption: An artist’s rendition of Enceladus, Saturn’s 6th largest moon. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech This past weekend, the Adler Planetarium celebrated the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11⁠—a mission that brought us to a whole new world, our Moon.  It’s pretty undeniable that our Moon is spectacular. It’s our only natural satellite, it’s composed of […]

Dr. Andrew Johnston | July Adler Staff Star

Adler Staff Star: Meet Andrew!

Thursday July 18th
Bianca Anderson

Dr. Andrew JohnstonVice President of Astronomy and Collections As someone who has worked in museums for the past 30 years (WOW!), what has been the most rewarding experience for you? I began working in science museums when I was a teenager, so I feel very lucky to have been working in this business all my […]

Michelle Nichols helping young skywatchers observe the sky at a 'Scopes in the City event.

Building Community Under the Stars

Friday July 5th
Michelle Nichols

In September 2016, we—the Adler’s ’Scopes in the City team—brought a telescope to the Wrightwood-Ashburn library branch on Chicago’s southwest side and set it up in front of the library. This branch has a beautifully clear view of the sky with no tall buildings in the way. A teen involved in other library programs came […]

An artist's illustration of a brown dwarf. Image Credit: NASA

AstroFan: It’s a star! It’s a planet! No—it’s a brown dwarf?!

Monday June 24th
Bianca Anderson

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech Our Universe is filled with strange objects that even scientists have trouble classifying. Read on to learn about brown dwarfs, the celestial objects that are kind of like a star and kind of like a planet but are actually neither. A wise man once said, “Only a Sith deals in absolutes”. That […]

Milky Way in the sky and reflected in a lake with silhouetted trees between the sky and the lake taken at Middle Fork River Forest Preserve Image Credit: Nick Lake

Adler Sky Observing 101: What To See

Tuesday June 18th
Michelle Nichols

From moon phases to meteor showers, the Adler Planetarium has got you covered when it comes to knowing what to look for in the sky. Read our list below to get started! At all times, half of our Moon is lit by the Sun, just as half of the Earth is always lit by the […]

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