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Category: Astronomy 101

Guests dressed up in costume at Adler After Dark: Go Boldy in 2016.

Does The Multiverse Exist?

Thursday December 12th
Megan Lothamer

Header Image: Guests dressed up in costume at Adler After Dark: Go Boldy in 2016. If you’re even a little bit into sci-fi, then there’s a good chance you’ve watched, read, or consumed SOMETHING that references multiverses. In fact, multiverse theory has gained popularity as of late. From Marvel comics to Doctor Who to Rick and […]

An artist’s illustration of Kepler-452b.

Exoplanets: Sci-Fi vs. Fact

Thursday December 5th
Grace Wolf-Chase, Ph.D.

Header Image: An artist’s illustration of Kepler-452b. Image Credit: NASA Ames/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle Editor’s Note: Updated in May 2023. I was an undergraduate physics major at Cornell University, with my eye on a career in astronomy, when I saw the original Star Wars movie following its release in 1977. A rather famous astronomer and science popularizer […]

This image depicts the thick ring of dust that can obscure the energetic processes that occur near a supermassive black hole of an active galactic nuclei.

AstroFan: A Feast Fit For A Black Hole

Friday November 29th
Bianca Anderson

Header Image: An artist’s illustration of a thick ring of dust near the supermassive black hole of an active galactic nuclei. Image Credit: NASA / SOFIA / Lynette Cook   Ah yes, it is the day after Thanksgiving, and I bet you’re currently dealing with the inevitable ‘post-feast malaise’. What if I told you that at this […]

Understanding Planet Transits

Friday November 8th
Megan Lothamer

Planet transits are unique celestial events that allow us to measure the geometry of our own Solar System and beyond! Catch the next transit of Mercury at the Adler Planetarium this November!

This image depicts a cluster of distorted galaxies. The distorted shapes in the cluster shown here are distant galaxies, from which the light is bent by the gravitational pull of dark matter within the cluster of galaxies.

AstroFan: The Spooky Case of Dark Matter

Sunday October 27th
Bianca Anderson

Header Image: The distorted shapes in the cluster shown here are distant galaxies, from which the light is bent by the gravitational pull of dark matter within the cluster of galaxies. Image Credit: NASA, ESA, M. Postman (STScI), and the CLASH Team Greetings fellow astro-fans! Halloween is almost here, and as you know, it is […]

The far side of Earth's Moon as seen based on data from cameras aboard NASA's robotic Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft. Image Credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center/Arizona State University

It’s a Marvelous Year For a Moondance

Friday October 4th
Megan Lothamer

Header Image: The far side of Earth’s Moon as seen based on data from cameras aboard NASA’s robotic Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft. Credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center/Arizona State University Heads up! We’re blasting off into a very SPACE (and Moon) themed weekend. Today, we kick off World Space Week, which runs from October 4-10. This […]

Image of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

AstroFan: The Comet That Came From Afar

Monday September 30th
Bianca Anderson

Header Image: While C/2019 Q4 (Borisov) is too far away for us to get detailed images, it probably looks something like this image taken on March 27, 2016, by the Rosetta spacecraft, 329 km from the nucleus of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The image measures 28.7 km across. Image Credit: ESA/Rosetta/NavCam The Day the Adler Met an […]

How to spot the International Space Station

How to Spot the International Space Station

Tuesday September 24th
Megan Lothamer

Every summer, Michelle Larson, President and CEO of the Adler Planetarium, loves to attend a star party (or two!) with her family. Star parties are one of those scenarios where groups of people get together and camp out in a place where the night sky is highly visible. People bring tents, blankets, hot chocolate… and […]

This montage of images of the Saturnian system was prepared from an assemblage of images taken by the Voyager 1 spacecraft during its Saturn encounter in November 1980. This artist's view shows Dione in the forefront, Saturn rising behind, Tethys and Mimas fading in the distance to the right, Enceladus and Rhea off Saturn's rings to the left, and Titan in its distant orbit at the top. The Voyager Project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California. Credit: NASA/JPL

Brothers & Sisters of Cronus: Meet Saturn’s Moons!

Friday August 30th
Lucianne Walkowicz

Header Image: This montage of images of the Saturnian system was prepared from an assemblage of images taken by the Voyager 1 spacecraft during its Saturn encounter in November 1980. This artist’s view shows Dione in the forefront, Saturn rising behind, Tethys and Mimas fading in the distance to the right, Enceladus and Rhea off […]

Volunteers using the web-based Milky Way Project brought star-forming features nicknamed "yellowballs" to the attention of researchers, who later showed that they are a phase of massive star formation. The yellow balls -- which are several hundred to thousands times the size of our solar system -- are pictured here in the center of this image taken by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. Infrared light has been assigned different colors; yellow occurs where green and red overlap. The yellow balls represent an intermediary stage of massive star formation that takes place before massive stars carve out cavities in the surrounding gas and dust (seen as green-rimmed bubbles with red interiors in this image). Infrared light of 3.6 microns is blue; 8-micron light is green; and 24-micron light is red.

AstroFan: …And They Were All Yellow!

Monday August 26th
Bianca Anderson

Header Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech “The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies, were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” ― Carl Sagan Even if you’re just a novice space enthusiast, I’m sure you’ve heard some variation of […]

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